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Chinese Drywall      
       

    latest links:  http://www.cpsc.gov/info/drywall/index.html

Check Your Home for Defective Chinese Drywall

If your home has a sulfur, or rotten egg smell, get started immediately investigating for defective drywall. This smell has also been explained as being similar to the smell of a match that has been struck and blown out.

Risks to Health and Home

Some homeowners with Chinese drywall report a strong sulfur smell, similar to that of rotten eggs, permeating their homes. Health problems are said to include headaches, respiratory ailments, irritated eyes, and nosebleeds. In addition, the toxic gas is thought to be responsible for corroding copper and tarnishing silver, resulting in the failure of everything from computers and TVs to air conditioners and refrigerators. Even electrical wiring and switches have been affected, as have the silver on mirrors and jewelry.

Inspecting for Chinese Drywall Syndrome:

Note: Not all symptoms are a clear indication of Chinese drywall. The only way to be sure of the presence of Chinese drywall syndrome is through lab testing of samples of the drywall. We strongly recommend lab testing of the drywall prior to the closing of your home, visual inspections can not and should not be relied upon as a definitive analysis for Chinese drywall.

Failure to perform laboratory testing  for Chinese drywall relieves Florida Master Home inspectors, inc and its officers and employees of any present or future liability. We will be glad to provide you with a free quote for lab testing.

When Imported

According to estimates, approximately 20 million square feet of Chinese drywall has been imported into the U.S. since 2001. It’s thought to have been installed in somewhere between 50,000 to 100,000 homes. Problems have been reported so far in over a dozen states including Alabama, Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Mississippi, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, Texas, and Virginia. Homeowners in Florida have been the hardest hit, with over 140 complaints received and several class action lawsuits filed.

Products Involved

Chinese drywall made by 20 different companies was imported into the U.S. between 2001 and 2008. Several of them—including Knauf Plasterboard Tianjin (KPT), Knauf Gips (KG), and Taishan Gypsum Co.—have been the focus of the lawsuits that have been filed to date.